Bereiter Presentation on Clerical Combatants

briansandberg:

Bereiter Presentation on Clerical Combatants

Originally posted on Center for the Study of Religious Violence:

Greg Bereiter, “Clerical Combatants: Clergy and Armed Conflict During the French Wars of Religion”

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

4 pm

Towner Fellows’ Lounge, Newberry Library

Greg Bereiter (Ph.D. candidate in History at Northern Illinois University) is presenting at the Newberry Library Colloquium.

Despite traditional taboos on clerical involvement in armed conflict and arms-bearing in general, Catholic clergy became key military and political actors at the height of the French Wars of Religion. This presentation will examine some of the unexpected ways in which Catholic clergy participated directly in religious violence and civil conflict during a period of severe sectarian antagonism between Calvinists, moderate or politique Catholics, and extremist Catholic Leaguers throughout the most intense phase of the long Wars of Religion, which devastated the kingdom of France between 1562 and 1629.

For more details, see the Newberry Library website.

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Nina Dubin Lecture

The Newberry Center for Renaissance Studies presents:

Saturday, April 19, 2014, 2:00 pm
Eighteenth-Century Seminar
Nina Dubin, University of Illinois at Chicago
“Love, Trust, Risk: Painting ‘The Papered Century’”
http://www.newberry.org/04192014-nina-dubin

The precirculated paper for this seminar will be delivered electronically to registrants.

A reception will follow the lecture. Those who attend are also welcome to join Nina Dubin and the organizers for dinner. If interested, please contact Lisa Freeman by email: lfreeman@uic.edu

This program is free and open to the public, but space is limited and registration in advance is required by 10 am Friday, April 18.

Please forward this message to others who may be interested. Download a printable PDF flyer to post and distribute.

Keep up with the Center for Renaissance Studies by following our blog: http://www.newberry.org/center-renaissance-studies-blog

Faculty and graduate students at member institutions of the Center for Renaissance Studies consortium (including Northern Illinois University) may be eligible to apply for travel funding to attend this program (http://www.newberry.org/newberry-renaissance-consortium-grants).

Posted in Art History, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, History of the Book, Lectures and Seminars | Leave a comment

Rethinking State Trials

Symposium on Rethinking the State Trials: The Politics of Justice in Later Stuart England
Organized by Brian Cowan (McGill University) and Scott Sowerby (Northwestern University) and sponsored by the Newberry Center for Renaissance Studies

newberrylibrary

Thursday, April 10 (at Northwestern University)
Friday, April 11 (at the Newberry)

This program is free and open to the public, but space is limited and registration in advance is required by 10 am Thursday, April 10.

Papers will be precirculated electronically to registrants.

Faculty and graduate students at member institutions of the Center for Renaissance Studies consortium (including Northern Illinois University) may be eligible to apply for travel funding to attend this program (http://www.newberry.org/newberry-renaissance-consortium-grants).

For more information, see the symposium website:
http://www.newberry.org/04102014-symposium-rethinking-state-trials-politics-justice-later-stuart-england

Posted in Civil Conflict, Conferences, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, European Wars of Religion, History of Violence, Human Rights, Noble Culture and History of Elites, State Development Theory | 1 Comment

Cosimo I de’ Medici in Chicago

Early Modern Workshop

Christine Zappella, PhD Student in Art History, will present a paper on “Bronzino’s Portrait of Cosimo I de’ Medici as Orpheus: Erotic Furor and Florence’s Perfect Prince” in the The Early Modern Workshop at the University of Chicago.

Monday April 14th at 5pm.

Pick 319

University of Chicago

Graduate students interested in Renaissance history and art history may be interested in this workshop.

 

Posted in Art History, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, Italian History, Lectures and Seminars, Mediterranean World | Leave a comment

Problems with Big Data

Big Data is touted as revolutionary by many media pundits and computer enthusiasts, but there are serious limitations to the uses of so-called Big Data.

BigData

An op-ed in the New York Times discusses the many problems with Big Data. The authors of this piece ask “Is big data really all it’s cracked up to be?”

Their answer is that: “There is no doubt that big data is a valuable tool that has already had a critical impact in certain areas. … But precisely because of its newfound popularity and growing use, we need to be levelheaded about what big data can — and can’t — do.”

The New York Times published the op-ed online. I discussed the problems with ‘big data’ in a previous post on “Big Data is Bullshit.”

Posted in Digital Humanities, History in the Media, History of Science | Leave a comment

Early Modern Domestic Space

A lecture on “Illuminating Early Modern Domestic Spaces”

by

Professor Ann Smart Martin

Stanley and Polly Stone Professor

Director, Material Culture Program and Department of Art History

University of Wisconsin, Madison

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 at 5:30 PM

DePaul Art Museum

935 W. Fullerton Ave.

Chicago, Illinois

(just west of the Red Line stop at Fullerton)

Professor Martin specializes in American material culture and early American decorative arts.  Her publications include Buying into the World of Goods: Early Consumers in Backcountry Virginia (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008) and American Material Culture: The Shape of the Field (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1997), co-edited with J. Ritchie Garrison.

For more information, please contact Prof. Paul Jaskot at pjaskot@depaul.edu

Posted in Art History, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, Lectures and Seminars, Renaissance Art and History | Leave a comment

Wreckage, Waste, and Globalization

The continuing search for Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 is complicated by the immense size of the search area and its distance from sea lanes and major ports, as well as the nature of the Indian Ocean.

IndianOcean-waste

The currents and turbulence of the Indian Ocean presents challenges in sighting and tracking potential aircraft wreckage. Satellite photos showing possible pieces of an airplane could be instead showing flotsam from previous wrecks and storms, or simply waste produced by globalization and circulated through transoceanic currents.

SearchVectors

According to the BBC, “the satellite photos [of potential objects] cover a zone where the Indian Ocean meets the Southern Ocean, encircling Antarctica. There is a risk … that waste in this area could have come from any of the world’s major oceans – all of which border Antarctica. In that case, the flecks in the pictures may just be the floating detritus of globalisation, such as some of the thousands of shipping containers thought to be lost at sea every year.”

 

The frustrating search for the missing Malaysian Airlines aircraft highlights the growing problems of the globalization of waste and marine debris. Plastic pollution is perhaps the best known type of marine debris, due to scientific research and frequent media reports on the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch.”

NOAA-marinedebris

Environmental historians, maritime historians, marine archaeologists, and historians of globalization have been working on tracing the historical development of pollution, wreckage, and waste in the world’s seas and oceans over the past several centuries.

The BBC reports on the continuing search. See NOAA’s website on the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch,” and its project on Marine Debris.

 

Posted in Globalization, Information Management, Maritime History, Mediterranean World | Leave a comment