Position in Early Modern European History

Northeastern Illinois University is advertising for a faculty position in Early Modern European History.

The position description reads:

“Early Modern Europe and the World: Assistant Professor with a strong field in Europe (excluding Russia) from c. 1450-c. 1789.  Desirable fields include, but are not limited to, transnational processes such as trade, migration, capitalism, the history of science and technology, or the formation of European states. The successful candidate will be required to teach within the department’s Western Civilization sequence, as well as upper-division and graduate courses in her/his specialty.  The ability to teach historical methods at the undergraduate and graduate levels is a plus, as would be experience with digital historical sources and new media.

Applicants should send a cover letter, CV, three letters of recommendation, a chapter or article-length writing sample, and evidence of teaching preparation (syllabi, course evaluations, etc.).  Materials can be sent to Professor Francesca Morgan, Chair, Early Modern Europe Search, Dept. of History, Northeastern Illinois University, 5500 N. St. Louis Ave., Chicago, IL 60625-4699.   Electronic submissions are welcome: F-Morgan@neiu.eduReview of applications begins February 20, 2018.”

For more information, see H-Net.

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Posted in Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, Graduate Work in History, Jobs and Positions | Leave a comment

Presentation at the University of Chicago

I am looking forward to presenting at the Early Modern and Mediterranean Worlds Workshop at the University of Chicago next week.

Brian Sandberg, “Conversion, Confessional Politics, and Violence in the Final Stages of the French Wars of Religion, 1598-1629”
Early Modern and Mediterranean Worlds Workshop
Monday 29 January 2018
Rosenwald 405
University of Chicago

For more information, see: https://voices.uchicago.edu/emmw/

Posted in Civil Conflict, Cultural History, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, European Wars of Religion, French Wars of Religion, History of Violence, Languedoc and Southern France, Political Culture, Reformation History, Religious History, Religious Politics, Religious Violence, Renaissance Art and History, Warfare in the Early Modern World | 1 Comment

Graduate Student Conference at the Newberry Library

I am pleased that several of my former graduate students are participating in this week’s Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference, sponsored by the Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library.

“The Center for Renaissance Studies’ annual graduate student conference, organized and run by advanced doctoral students, has become a premier opportunity for emerging scholars to present papers, participate in discussions, and develop collaborations across the field of medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies in Europe, the Americas, and the Mediterranean world. Participants from a wide variety of disciplines find a supportive and collegial forum for their work, meet future colleagues from other institutions and disciplines, and become familiar with the Newberry and its resources.”

For the conference program and further information, see the Newberry Library website for the conference.

Posted in Conferences, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, European Wars of Religion, Graduate Work in History, Reformation History, Renaissance Art and History | 1 Comment

Cultures of Voting in Pre-Modern Europe

I am happy to report that my latest publication has been released, just in time for the new year.  Happy 2018!

My chapter on “Municipal elections and contested religious space: electoral practices and confessional politics in Mediterranean France during the French Wars of Religion,” appears in Cultures of Voting in Pre-Modern Europe, ed. Serena Ferente, Lovro Kunčević, and Miles Pattenden (Routledge, 2018).

The book description reads:

Cultures of Voting in Pre-modern Europe examines the norms and practices of collective decision-making across pre-modern European history, east and west, and their influence in shaping both intra- and inter-communal relationships.

Bringing together the work of twenty specialist contributors, this volume offers a unique range of case studies from Ancient Greece to the eighteenth century, and explores voting in a range of different contexts with analysis that encompasses constitutional and ecclesiastical history, social and cultural history, the history of material culture and of political thought. Together the case-studies illustrate the influence of ancient models and ideas of voting on medieval and early modern collectivities and document the cultural and conceptual exchange between different spheres in which voting took place. Above all, they foreground voting as a crucial element of Europe’s common political heritage and raise questions about the contribution of pre-modern cultures of voting to modern political and institutional developments.

Offering a wide chronological and geographical scope, Cultures of Voting in Pre-modern Europe is aimed at scholars and students of the history of voting and is a fascinating contribution to the key debates that surround voting today.

 

Posted in Early Modern Europe, European History, European Wars of Religion, French Wars of Religion, Mediterranean World, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Political Culture, Religious Politics, Renaissance Art and History, State Development Theory | Leave a comment

Renaissance Map Forgery

The auction house Christie’s has withdrawn an allegedly forged Renaissance map from its auction listings after scholars and map dealers questioned its authenticity.

The map is a print of Martin Waldseemüller’s famous 1507 world map, one of the first to use the name “America” to designate the continents of North and South America.

Nick Wilding, Associate Professor of History at Georgia State University, was one of the experts to raised concerns about the authenticity of the map.  Nick is a former colleague of mine at the Medici Archive Project and an expert on the history of science and the history of the book in the early modern world.

The New York Times interviewed Nick for its story on the forgery and explains that: “For Mr. Wilding, the biggest clue that something was off, he said, was a white line in the Christie’s map. It matched a spot in an authentic print of the map now held at the James Ford Bell Library at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, where extra paper had apparently been added to repair a tear. An original map, one that came directly off the woodblock, would not have replicated that tear, which happened later, Mr. Wilding said. But this map did and so, he said, he believes the map Christie’s has represents a reproduction of the Bell map.”

The New York Times reports on the Waldseemüller forgery.

Posted in Atlantic World, Cartographic History, Digital Humanities, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, Globalization, History in the Media, History of Science, History of the Book, Italian History, Maritime History, Renaissance Art and History | Leave a comment

Crowd-funding French History

The BBC reports that that a crowd-funding project has successfully raised money to purchase a thirteenth-century French castle.

“Thousands of internet users have joined forces to save Mothe-Chandeniers chateau in France. By contributing at least €51 (£45; $61) each, they managed to raise €500,000 needed to buy the ruined 13th Century castle. Each participant is now a co-owner of Mothe-Chandeniers, which the online community plans to restore.”

Medieval and early modern French historians (and especially historians of noble culture, castle design, and military architecture) will be interested in this crowd-funding project to save a medieval French castle. 

The BBC reports on the crowd-funding efforts.

 

 

 

Posted in Early Modern Europe, European History, French History, History of Violence, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Renaissance Art and History, War and Society, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World | Leave a comment

Warrior Pursuits in Paperback

I am happy to report that Warrior Pursuits: Noble Culture and Civil Conflict in Early Modern France (Johns Hopkins University Press) has been released in paperback!

Posted in Early Modern Europe, European History, European Wars of Religion, French History, French Wars of Religion, History of Violence, Languedoc and Southern France, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Religious Violence, Revolts and Revolutions, War and Society, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World | Leave a comment