Graduate Conference in Premodern Studies

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library has extended the deadline for submissions to their graduate conference in premodern studies.

Graduate students in premodern studies at Northern Illinois University may want to consider submitting a proposal to this conference. NIU is a member of the Newberry Library Consortium, so graduate students can apply for funding to participate in conferences and workshops or to conduct research in Newberry Library collections.

Here is the announcement from the Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library:

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library is pleased to announce that submissions for our 2022 Multidisciplinary Graduate Conference in Premodern Studies are now open. This annual graduate student conference, organized and run by advanced doctoral students, has become a premier opportunity for emerging scholars to present papers, participate in discussions, and develop collaborations across all fields of medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies. Participants from a wide variety of disciplines find a supportive and collegial forum for their work, meet future colleagues from other institutions and disciplines, and become familiar with the Newberry and its resources.

In 2022, the conference will adopt a hybrid (virtual and in-person) format. Graduate students may submit proposals for virtual workshops of pre-circulated papers or in-person panel presentations. We will also set aside some space for virtual panel presentations for those who cannot travel but prefer to present traditional papers. Participants may attend both the virtual and in-person portions of the conference, but may only present work at one session. We invite proposals for papers from students in masters or PhD programs on any humanities topic relating to material before 1800. We encourage submissions from disciplines as varied as the literature of any language, history, classics, anthropology, art history, music, comparative literature, theater arts, philosophy, political science, religious studies, transatlantic studies, disability studies, and manuscript studies. All papers must be in English.

The 2022 conference program will include virtual and in-person sessions relating to career diversity, professionalization, and rare book presentations in addition to the workshops and conference panels.

Please note that when submitting a proposal, you must indicate whether you are applying to a virtual workshop with pre-circulated materials (8-12 pages, due January 3, 2022) OR a traditional panel presentation (20-minute papers, primarily in person with some virtual sessions available). You are welcome to submit proposals for both a workshop and a panel presentation, but each proposal must be submitted separately, and you will only be able to present at ONE session.

Abstract submissions will be accepted online only. The extended deadline to submit an abstract through our online submission form is Friday, October 15, 2021 at 11:59pm Central Time.

For more information about the conference, including a link to the online submission form, visit the conference calendar page here: https://www.newberry.org/01172022-2022-multidisciplinary-graduate-student-conference-nlgrad22

Posted in Cultural History, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, Graduate Work in History, Reformation History, Renaissance Art and History | Leave a comment

ePublic of Letters

I tuned in online this week for the launch of the ePublic of Letters lecture series, organized by Monique O’Connell and Brian Maxson.

Brian Maxson did a nice job of kicking off this new lecture series with a lecture on Vespasiano da Bisticci, Florentine bookseller and writer. The talk focused on Vespasiano’s Lives and its depiction of Florentine patricians and other contemporaries during the second half of the fifteenth century.

This lecture fit nicely with the current themes in my course on The Renaissance at Northern Illinois University, since my students have been discussing friendship, political patronage, betrayal, and exile in Renaissance Florence using Dale Kent’s Friendship, Love, and Trust in Renaissance Florence (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009). Vespasiano da Bisticci figures in Kent’s discussion of Cosimo il vecchio de’ Medici’s patronage networks.

Vespasiano da Bisticci, from Vita di Gianozzo Manetti, Add 9770, f.6r (vellum), British Library.

This lecture is also timely, since Ross King has just published a new popular history of the Renaissance focused on Vespasiano: Ross King, The Bookseller of Florence: The Story of Manuscripts that Illuminated the Renaissance (2021).

The British Library has manuscripts by Vespasiano da Bisticci, including some digitized sources. The University of Bologna hosts a digital humanities project on Vespasiano da Bisticci’s letters.

The ePublic of Letters group expects to launch a website soon.

Posted in Cultural History, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, History in the Media, History of the Book, Italian History, Lectures and Seminars, Manuscript Studies, Renaissance Art and History | Leave a comment

Teaching the History of Race

Historians confront the complicated history of race and racism in the pre-modern, modern, and contemporary world.

Yet, historians and social science teachers in the United States are under attack by conservative politicians and political activists. Many conservative political groups have long sought to promote a “patriotic” interpretation of United States history that supports nationalism and sanitizes racial problems and conflicts within American society.

For decades, the “Culture Wars” have generated controversies over high school history teaching, history textbook approvals, statewide history curricula, and museum exhibits.

The recent Texas ban on teaching race in history classrooms is one of the latest rounds in the “Culture Wars.”

Elementary school classroom. Photo: The New Yorker

The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is opposing the attempts by the Texas Attorney General to ban discussions of race and racism in classrooms.

The AAUP reports: “Last week the AAUP submitted a brief to Texas attorney general Ken Paxton strongly opposing recent political efforts to ban ideas from the classroom. The brief was filed in response to a recent request from State Rep. James White for an opinion on whether teaching about race and racism in America, including critical race theory (CRT), would violate the civil rights of Texans. This insidious political maneuver to ban discussion of racial inequality is part of a broader right wing assault on the ability to teach truthfully about the impact of racism on American history and society.”

The AAUP emphasizes that: “These attempts to limit classroom discussion stand in irreconcilable conflict with the principles of free inquiry, free thought, and free expression, which the AAUP has championed for more than a century. The AAUP’s brief underscores how these transparent attempts to dictate the education provided by faculty could undermine higher education, violate academic freedom, and result in censorship and indoctrination.”

The AAUP has also issued a statement on legislative attempts in multiple states to limit discussions of the history of race and racism.

The current controversy over teaching the history of race is simply the latest round in the “History Wars” in the United States. There have been parallel “History Wars” in Canada, Australia, United Kingdom, France, Japan, and many other nations on teaching of race, imperialism, and genocide in public high schools and universities. The debates over history teaching intersect with broader issues of public history and historical memory in the “Culture Wars.”

See my previous post on Historians’ responses to the controversy over Critical Race Theory.

For context on History and the broader “Culture Wars,” see the following works:

David W. Blight, “The Fog of History Wars,” The New Yorker, 9 June 2021.

Dane Kennedy, “The Imperial History Wars.” Journal of British Studies, 54(1), (2015): 5-22.

Roger D. Launius, “Public History Wars, the ‘One Nation/One People’ Consensus, and the Continuing Search for a Usable Past,” OAH Magazine of History, Volume 27, Issue 1 (January 2013): 31–36.

Gary B. Nash, Charlotte Crabtree, and Ross E. Dunn, History on Trial: Culture Wars and the Teaching of the Past (Vintage Books, 2000).

Edward Tabor Linenthal and Tom Engelhardt, eds., History Wars: The Enola Gay and Other Battles for the American Past (New York: Metropolitan Books, 1996).

Posted in Academic Freedom, Education Policy, High School History Teaching, History in the Media, History of Race and Racism, Humanities Education, Museums and Historical Memory, The Past Alive: Teaching History | Leave a comment

Virtual Rome

My students in HIST 420 The Renaissance at Northern Illinois University recently discussed the intellectual movement of Humanism in the Renaissance, focusing especially on the Humanists’ fascination with antiquities and their nostalgia for ancient Rome. Students read passages from Poggio Bracciolini, Bartolomeo Platina, and Lorenzo Valla and discussed humanists’ book collecting, the Vatican Library, the rebuilding of Rome under Pope Nicholas V in the mid-fifteenth century.

There are a number of virtual reality platforms for viewing the city of Rome at different points in history. Students may be interested in exploring the city of Rome virtually using one or more of the online platforms.

Virtual Rome project at the University of Reading

All of the virtual reality reconstructions of Rome are intriguing, but they also make choices in historical interpretation. Most of these virtual reality models have been created by commercial computer gaming companies or through partnerships with them. The commercial interests of the computer gaming and tourism industries clearly play a significant role in this form of public history and digital humanities.

There are free platforms and introductory trailers available at the following sites:

Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood (trailer): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nat2iu19G4

Baroque Rome (Emory): www.baroquerome.org

History 3D: Ancient Rome 320 A.D.: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btKooS7k3nw

Rome Reborn: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8hqR2O8HiM

Virtual Rome (website): https://research.reading.ac.uk/virtualrome/

Virtual Rome (trailer): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZ2NWXp-1Y4&t=301s

For a detailed study of city views, print culture, and tourism in Renaissance Rome, see: Rebecca Zorach, ed., The Virtual Tourist in Renaissance Rome: Printing and Collecting the Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2008). A book description is available at the University of Chicago Press website.

Posted in Ancient History, Art History, Cultural History, Digital Humanities, Early Modern Europe, Empires and Imperialism, European History, History in the Media, History of the Book, Humanities Education, Intellectual History, Italian History, Mediterranean World, Museums and Historical Memory, Renaissance Art and History, The Past Alive: Teaching History | Leave a comment

Paleography Studies

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library is offering a series of courses in paleography studies intended for graduate students in the humanities.

Paleography skills are vital for manuscript studies and archival work in the discipline of history, especially in premodern periods.

Graduate students in medieval and early modern history at Northern Illinois University may be interested in these courses. Northern Illinois University is a member of the Newberry Library Consortium, which means that NIU graduate students are eligible for funding for courses and events at the Newberry Library.

Here is the announcement from the Center for Renaissance Studies:

The Center for Renaissance Studies is pleased to announce that The University of Warwick’s Centre for the Study of the Renaissance is once again offering courses in Renaissance palaeography (this year with an emphasis on either English or Latin texts) aimed particularly at graduate students and early career researchers. It is also once again offering a two-term course on Latin for Research in the Humanities, open to post-beginners.

The courses meet exclusively online and are open for booking until 21 September 2021 at the latest. They are being offered at times that should be convenient for participants in the UK, continental Europe, and the Americas.

Participants from institutions in the Newberry Library Consortium may be eligible to have their course costs partially or completely refunded through Newberry Renaissance Consortium Grants. Eligible participants should check with their local consortium representative for further details.

Both Palaeography courses provide some theoretical elements on manuscripts and prints, but strongly emphasize transcription practice and discussion within a seminar format. The Latin for Research course explores and compares writing styles and approaches of humanists from across Europe.

In the interests of having a cohort of approximately comparable experience and abilities, applicants are required to fill out a brief questionnaire for each course. Places are limited, and early applications are strongly encouraged. For general details of the palaeography courses, see https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/manuscripttoprint/  

English Palaeography (Autumn 2021)
Instructor: Dr. Aidan Norrie

This course will familiarise students with English handwriting from the period 1500 to 1700. It will give students the skills to work with a range of English primary sources from the early modern period. Students will build a strong knowledge of early modern hands. The course will cover secretary, italic, and mixed scripts, both formal and informal. Students will learn common abbreviations used in handwritten documents, as well as the idiosyncratic letter forms that make primary sources from the period initially seem so difficult to transcribe. For further details and booking page, see https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/manuscripttoprint/english 


Latin Palaeography (Autumn 2021)
Instructor: Prof. David Lines

This course aims to provide the tools necessary to read and accurately transcribe manuscript and printed sources (in Latin) from the late medieval period to the seventeenth century. Since these are written in various kinds of scripts (gothic, humanistic, etc.), some time will be spent examining each of these. The course starts from printed materials, which are somewhat easier to navigate and usually contain fewer abbreviations, and works its way back toward manuscripts and archival documents. It includes a variety of genres, from literary and philosophical/theological works to archival records. For further details and booking page, see https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/manuscripttoprint/latin 

Latin for Research in the Humanities (Autumn 2021 and Spring 2022)
Instructor: Mr Iván Parga Ornelas

This course helps participants (staff or students) develop the ability to read and understand Renaissance Latin  texts, while allowing them to brush up their Latin skills for research purposes. The weekly meetings of approximately 90 minutes focus on a selected number of Neo-Latin authors (this year: Petrarch, Erasmus, Leon Battista Alberti, and Thomas More) and will build familiarity with their particular styles and rhetorical practices. Sessions typically consist of the reading and translation of a fourteenth- to sixteenth-century text, supported by grammar and vocabulary revision. For further details and booking page, see https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/ren/latin4research/ 

Posted in Archival Research, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, Graduate Work in History, Lectures and Seminars, Manuscript Studies, Reformation History, Renaissance Art and History | Leave a comment

Multidisciplinary Graduate Conference in Premodern Studies

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library is currently organizing its annual Multidisciplinary Graduate Conference in Premodern Studies.

Graduate students in premodern history at Northern Illinois University are encouraged to submit a proposal. Graduate students taking HIST 520 The Renaissance at NIU this Fall will be especially interested in this conference.

Here is the call for papers from the Center for Renaissance Studies:

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library is pleased to announce that submissions for our 2022 Multidisciplinary Graduate Conference in Premodern Studies are now open. This annual graduate student conference, organized and run by advanced doctoral students, has become a premier opportunity for emerging scholars to present papers, participate in discussions, and develop collaborations across all fields of medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies. Participants from a wide variety of disciplines find a supportive and collegial forum for their work, meet future colleagues from other institutions and disciplines, and become familiar with the Newberry and its resources.

In 2022, the conference will adopt a hybrid (virtual and in-person) format. Graduate students may submit proposals for virtual workshops of pre-circulated papers or in-person panel presentations. We will also set aside some space for virtual panel presentations for those who cannot travel but prefer to present traditional papers. Participants may attend both the virtual and in-person portions of the conference, but may only present work at one session. We invite proposals for papers from students in masters or PhD programs on any humanities topic relating to material before 1800. We encourage submissions from disciplines as varied as the literature of any language, history, classics, anthropology, art history, music, comparative literature, theater arts, philosophy, political science, religious studies, transatlantic studies, disability studies, and manuscript studies. All papers must be in English.

The 2022 conference program will include virtual and in-person sessions relating to career diversity, professionalization, and rare book presentations in addition to the workshops and conference panels.

Please note that when submitting a proposal, you must indicate whether you are applying to a virtual workshop with pre-circulated materials (8-12 pages, due January 3, 2022) OR a traditional panel presentation (20-minute papers, primarily in person with some virtual sessions available). You are welcome to submit proposals for both a workshop and a panel presentation, but each proposal must be submitted separately, and you will only be able to present at ONE session.

Abstract submissions will be accepted online only. The deadline to submit an abstract through our online submission form is Monday, October 11, 2021 at 11:59pm Central Time.

For more information about the conference, including a link to the online submission form, visit the conference calendar page here: https://www.newberry.org/01172022-2022-multidisciplinary-graduate-student-conference-nlgrad22

Posted in Conferences, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, Graduate Work in History, Italian History, Medieval History, Reformation History, Renaissance Art and History | Leave a comment

Geckos, Environmental History, and the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade

Historians are collaborating with scientists in new ways these days, especially in the growing field of environmental history. Scholars are making new and fascinating discoveries about the long history of human transformations of environments.

Historians of the Columbian Exchange, beginning with groundbreaking environmental historian Alfred Crosby, have argued that the environmental changes wrought by trans-oceanic and global exchanges from c. 1500 to today have been monumental. Some scholars use the term “anthropocene” to describe a new era in earth’s history based on human’s ability to transform global environmental systems and affect climate change.

Geckos offer a nice example of how environmental history and science can provide new perspectives on humans’ roles in reshaping the natural environment.

Often overlooked as a “trash” species according to one researcher, the African house gecko has spread far and wide in the Americas.
African house gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia)

The New York Times reports: “Little and brown, the African house gecko is now widespread in the Western Hemisphere. But the gecko originated in southeastern Africa, from Zimbabwe, Mozambique and nearby areas. So how did it cross an ocean and come here?”

A new study of various lineages of the African house gecko, Hemidactylus mabouia, provides evidence on the spread of this species of gecko in the Americas. Ishan Agarwal, et al, recently published their findings in an article entitled, “How the African house gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia) conquered the world,” in The Royal Society.

According to The New York Times, “the paper also offers a new way to test an old hypothesis — that African house geckos stowed away on vessels involved with the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The slave trade is also thought to have transported the Aedes aegypti mosquito and several earthworm species to the Americas from the African continent, and the new research further reveals its ecological effects in addition to its human toll.”

Ishan Agarwal, et al, “How the African house gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia) conquered the world,” is published by The Royal Society.

Alfred W. Crosby’s study of the Columbian Exchange was originally published in 1972. A new edition was released in 2003: Alfred W. Crosby, Jr. The Columbian Exchange: Biological and Cultural Consequences of 1492, 30th Anniversary Edition (Praeger, 2003).

Posted in Atlantic World, Early Modern World, Empires and Imperialism, Environmental History, Globalization, History of Science, Maritime History, Renaissance Art and History, World History | Leave a comment

History of the Medici Family Podcast

I recently gave an interview on the history of the Medici family for an episode of the Ithaca Bound podcast, hosted by Andrew Schiestel.

I spent three years working as a post-doctoral fellow with the Medici Archive Project, a major Digital Humanities project based in Florence, Italy. So, it is always fun to discuss the Medici family and their fascinating history.

The episode, entitled “The Medici Family during the Italian Renaissance” is available streaming online at the Ithaca Bound website.

Ithaca Bound website on PodBean

I want to thank Andre Schiestel for inviting me to join him in discussing the history of the Medici family for the podcast.

Ithaca Bound is a podcast specializing in Mediterranean history and culture. The Ithaca Bound website indicates that “The Ithaca Bound podcast is a daily podcast that explores history and mythology in the Mediterranean Basin. It’s hosted by Andrew Schiestel.”

For more information on the history of the Medici family, see the Medici Archive Project website.

Posted in Art History, Court Studies, Cultural History, Digital Humanities, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, History in the Media, Italian History, Mediterranean World, Renaissance Art and History | Leave a comment

Historians Respond to Critical Race Theory Controversy

Historians and educators across the United States are responding to the current political attacks on Critical Race Theory and politicians’ attempts to dictate the ways in which professional historians teach about race and racism in American history.

Many historians and journalists have rightly pointed out that the entire controversy over Critical Race Theory has been manufactured by Christopher Rufo, a far-right political activist, and his allies based on serious and deliberate misunderstandings of the history of race and racism in the American colonies, and later in the United States. The opponents of Critical Race Theory simply ignore the well-documented history of race and racism in North America and they deny outright the existence of systematic institutional racism in the United States.

Far-right media organizations and extremist groups have amplified this “controversy” into a cause célèbre, prompting conservative politicians at the local, state, and national level to introduce new legislative measures to try to control the teaching of United States history. Their aim is to threaten the professional history and social studies teachers who educate middle school and high school students on the complexities of American history and society. Far-right group also seek to attack academic historians who conduct research on race and racism by challenging Critical Race Theory.

The American Historical Association, the flagship scholarly association of academic and professional historians in the United States, has joined with other academic organizations to respond directly to this manufactured political controversy by issuing a Joint Statement on Legislative Efforts to Restrict Education about Racism and American History.

The American Historical Association has announced that: “The American Association of University Professors, the American Historical Association, the Association of American Colleges & Universities, and PEN America have authored a joint statement stating their ‘firm opposition’ to legislation, introduced in at least 20 states, that would restrict the discussion of ‘divisive concepts’ in public education institutions. It is not possible to address divisions that exist, however, without an honest reckoning with their histories. ‘The clear goal of these efforts is to suppress teaching and learning about the role of racism in the history of the United States,’ the letter explains. Education proceeds from exploration, facts, and civil debate. ‘These legislative efforts,’ on the other hand, ‘seek to substitute political mandates for the considered judgment of professional educators, hindering students’ ability to learn and engage in critical thinking across differences and disagreements. . . . Americans of all ages deserve nothing less than a free and open exchange about history and the forces that shape our world today.'”

While the focus of this statement is on the teaching of United States History, we need to recognize the broader implications of this political controversy for teaching of World History and other history and social studies courses.

The history of race and racism is much longer and broader than many people have realized. Historians around the world are currently delving into evidence of longue durée patterns of racial categorization and racism. I have conducted research and published on the connections between race, violence, and imperialism in the early modern Mediterranean and Atlantic World. I recently participated in a conference on Centring Race in History: Antiquity to the Present, which showcased new findings in the growing field of research on the history race and racism in the premodern world.

I am a member of the American Historical Association and am active in the Society for French Historical Studies, Western Society for French History, World History Association, and other academic organizations that are signatories of the joint statement. I endorse the Joint Statement on Legislative Efforts to Restrict Education about Racism and American History.

Undergraduate students in Northern Illinois University’s History and Social Science Secondary Educator Licensure Programs will be especially interested in reading the AHA’s joint statement. NIU’s Department of History trains many students who go to become middle school and high school teachers of History and Social Sciences in Illinois. Professional educators will surely continue to grapple with the “History Wars” and the broader “Culture Wars” long after the current controversy over Critical Race Theory subsides.

The entire joint statement is available as a .pdf document on the American Historical Association’s website.

The Atlantic has published an article tracing the development of the political controversy about Critical Race Theory.

Michelle Goldberg describes Christopher Rufo as “a clever propagandist who has done more than anyone else to whip up the national uproar over critical race theory.” Her opinion column is available at The New York Times.

Eugene Robinson’s commentary on the Critical Race Theory controversy is available at The Washington Post.

Historian Tim Snyder, a specialist on the history of totalitarianism, has published an essay on the latest episodes in the culture wars, “The War on History is a War on Democracy,” in The New York Times.

Posted in Academic Freedom, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, Education Policy, Empires and Imperialism, European History, French History, Globalization, High School History Teaching, Historiography and Social Theory, History in the Media, History of Race and Racism, History of the Western World, History of Violence, Human Rights, Humanities Education, Mediterranean World, Museums and Historical Memory, Political Activism and Protest Culture, Political Culture, Renaissance Art and History, The Past Alive: Teaching History, United States History and Society, World History | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Multiracial Ships and Maritime History

Maritime historians have recognized that premodern ships represented diverse onboard communities, composed of multicultural—and often multiracial—crews. The social spaces of ships brought together officers, navigators, sailors, soldiers, artisans, and slaves recruited or coerced from very different population groups.

But, the written evidence of crew members’ social origins is often very sparse, since permanent navies did not develop until the seventeenth century and premodern records rarely focused on detailing the background of sailors and other crew. Some exceptional archival documents have offered glimpses of the diversity of ships’ crews and historians have been exploiting such records to analyze maritime shipboard communities. For example, Sara Caputo (Magdalene College, University of Cambridge) has discovered evidence of the British Navy’s transnational recruitment of sailors during the eighteenth century. See: Sara Caputo, “Towards a Transnational History of the Eighteenth-Century British Navy / Vers une histoire transnationale de la marine britannique au XVIIIème siècle,” Annales Historiques de la Révolution Française 397 – Perspectives Transnationales, 1780s-1820 (2019): 13-32.

Now, new archaeological and DNA evidence offers additional information on the crew of a famous premodern ship, the Mary Rose, one of the principal warships in the fleet of King Henry VIII of England during the Franco-English wars of the first half of the sixteenth century.

Mary Rose, depicted on the Anthony Roll, 1546. Image: Pepys Library, Magdelene College, Cambridge.

BBC News reports that “archaeologists have been revealing the ethnic diversity of the crew on the Mary Rose using remains from the warship. The ship sank in 1545, but the wreck, 19,000 artefacts and the remains of 179 crew members were recovered in 1982.”

The sinking of the Mary Rose at the battle of Solent in 1545. Cowdray Engraving (detail).

Scientists have been analyzing the bodies of the Mary Rose crew members and are now publishing their results, revealing that the crew indeed was diverse, including at least one crew member of African origin. The work on the crew members of the Mary Rose demonstrates how research collaborations between scientists, archaeologists, and historians are vital to maritime history, the history of science, and the history of medicine. The new findings should provide additional evidence of interest to historians of premodern race and racism, such as collaborators in the RaceB4Race network.

The physical remains of the Mary Rose’s hull and artifacts salvaged from the shipwreck are now in the Mary Rose Museum in Portsmouth. The Mary Rose Museum website provides a history of the Mary Rose and information on the maritime archaeological operations to raise the remains of the ship.

The battle of Solent, 1545, portrayed in the Cowdray engraving.

The Mary Rose Museum’s website has a feature about the Cowdray engraving, an eighteenth-century copy of a sixteenth-century painting of the battle of Solent and the sinking of the Mary Rose.

BBC News has published a video report on the archaeological and DNA research on the Mary Rose crew members.

Posted in Atlantic World, Cultural History, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, History in the Media, History of Medicine, History of Race and Racism, History of Science, History of the Western World, History of Violence, Maritime History, Museums and Historical Memory, Renaissance Art and History, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World | Leave a comment