Monthly Archives: July 2013

Online Locomotive

The drive to implement MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) in higher education has become powerful. An article by Rob Jenkins in the Chronicle of Higher Education is calling the pro-MOOC movement an “online locomotive.” Jenkins, a professor of English at … Continue reading

Posted in Education Policy, Humanities Education, Information Management | Leave a comment

Of Dissertation ‘Embargos’ and Academic Publishing

The American Historical Association’s Council has issued a statement advocating “embargos” on Ph.D. dissertations. The idea is to avoid having Ph.D. dissertations diffused freely on the internet as soon as they are deposited. Instead, dissertations would be available through limited … Continue reading

Posted in Academic Publishing, Digital Humanities, Education Policy, Graduate Work in History, History of the Book, Humanities Education, Information Management | Leave a comment

Short-Term Fix for Student Loans

The U.S. Senate has approved legislation that would provide a short-term fix for the interest rates of federal student loans. If the legislation passes the U.S. House of Representatives current students would pay lower interest rates. But, there is a … Continue reading

Posted in Education Policy, Graduate Work in History, Humanities Education, Undergraduate Work in History | Leave a comment

Warrior Pursuits on the Radio

A discussion of Warrior Pursuits: Noble Culture and Civil Conflict in Early Modern France (2010) has been broadcast on internet radio on the New Books Network (NBN). Jay Lockenour recently interviewed me about Warrior Pursuits on New Books in Military … Continue reading

Posted in Civil Conflict, Current Research, Early Modern Europe, European Wars of Religion, French History, French Wars of Religion, History in the Media, History of Violence, Languedoc and Southern France, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Religious Politics, Religious Violence, Renaissance Art and History, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World | Leave a comment

Revisiting the Costa Concordia Disaster

The cruise liner Costa Concordia wrecked into the isola di Giglio, off the coast of Tuscany, on 13 January 2012. The ship then heeled over and partially capsized while its roughly 4,000 passengers were evacuating the ship. Thirty-two people died … Continue reading

Posted in Environmental History, European Union, Italian History, Maritime History, Mediterranean World | Leave a comment

Judith Slaying Holofernes (in Chicago)

Artemesia Gentileschi’s Judith Slaying Holofernes (c. 1620) is coming to Chicago! This famous painting is one of the quintessential images of gender and violence in the early modern period, as well as one of the masterpieces of one of the … Continue reading

Posted in Art History, Early Modern Europe, European History, European Wars of Religion, Gender and Warfare, History of Violence, Reformation History, Religious Violence, Renaissance Art and History, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World, Women and Gender History | 2 Comments

MOOCs and Remedial Education

Some community colleges have found a new way of incorporating MOOCs—not by replacing their courses, but by creating online study guides for students taking remedial classes or placement examinations. Community colleges such as Cuyahoga Community College (Cleveland, Ohio) “have created their … Continue reading

Posted in Education Policy, Humanities Education, Information Management, Undergraduate Work in History | Leave a comment