Aristocratic Souls in Democratic Times

Aristocratic Souls in Democratic Times, edited by Richard Avramenko and Ethan Alexander-Davey (Lexington Books, 2018) is currently being published.

This collective volume examines elites, political culture, and political theory from a variety of perspectives. The book includes an essay I wrote on “Furnishing War on Noble Credit: French Nobles, Commerce, and the Political Economy of Crédit.

The book description reads: “Great statesmen and gentlemen, men of honor and rank, seem to be phenomena of a bygone Aristocratic era. Aristocracies, which emphasize rank, and value difference, quality, beauty, rootedness, continuity, stand in direct contrast to democracies, which value equality, autonomy, novelty, standardization, quantity, utility and mobility. Is there any place for aristocratic values and virtues in the modern democratic social and political order? This volume consists of essays by political theorists, historians, and literary theorists that explore this question in the works of aristocratic thinkers, both ancient and modern. The volume includes analyses of aristocratic virtues, interpretations of aristocratic assemblies and constitutions, both historic and contemporary, as well as critiques of liberal virtues and institutions. Essays on Tacitus, Hobbes, Burke, Tocqueville, Nietzsche, as well as some lesser known figures, such as Henri de Boulainvilliers, John Randolph of Roanoke, Louis de Bonald, Konstantin Leontiev, Jose Ortega y Gasset, Richard Weaver, and the Eighth Duke of Northumberland, explore ways of preserving and adapting the salutary aspects of the aristocratic ethos to the needs of modern liberal societies.”

Aristocratic Souls in Democratic Times is listed on the website for Rowman and Littlefield.

 

This entry was posted in Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, French History, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Political Culture, State Development Theory. Bookmark the permalink.

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