Essay on “Ravages and Depredations”

I am happy to report that my essay on “Ravages and Depredations: Raiding War and Globalization in the Early Modern World,” has been published in Erica Charters, E., Marie Houllemare, and Peter H. Wilson, eds., A global history of early modern violence (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2020).

My chapter, “Ravages and Depredations: Raiding War and Globalization in the Early Modern World,” considers raiding warfare in southern France and the Mediterranean using French and francophone sources.

Here is the abstract: “Raiding war has often been characterized as ‘primitive war’, but raiding in the early modern world was highly organized and dynamic. This chapter examines evidence of raiding warfare in southern France and the Mediterranean during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. French experiences of raiding violence reveal three dimensions of early modern raiding warfare: borderlands raiding, economic devastation, and maritime raiding. Pirates and privateers launched repeated raids along the French coastlines, while soldiers, militia bands, and bandits engaged in significant raiding activities in the countryside and woodlands.”

The chapter is available for download at the Manchester University Press website, Openhive.

The entire ebook is now available in an open access version at the Manchester University Press website.

This entry was posted in Atrocities, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, Empires and Imperialism, European History, French History, French Wars of Religion, Globalization, History of Race and Racism, History of Violence, Languedoc and Southern France, Maritime History, Mediterranean World, Piracy, War and Society, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World. Bookmark the permalink.

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