Category Archives: Crowd Studies

Is the United States Close to Civil War?

Dana Milbank explores this provocative question in an op-ed in the Washington Post. The op-ed focuses on political science methods for considering how civil wars start: “Barbara F. Walter, a political science professor at the University of California at San … Continue reading

Posted in Civil Conflict, Crowd Studies, History in the Media, History of Violence, Political Activism and Protest Culture, Political Culture, Revolts and Revolutions, State Development Theory, United States History and Society, War, Culture, and Society | Leave a comment

¡ Viva la Libertad !

The Newberry Library is currently showing an exhibition on ¡ Viva la Libertad ! Latin American and the Age of Revolutions. ¡ Viva la Libertad ! explores Latin American revolutions in the nineteenth century and their legacies for Central and … Continue reading

Posted in Atlantic World, Civil Conflict, Comparative Revolutions, Crowd Studies, Cultural History, History of the Western World, History of Violence, Human Rights, Manuscript Studies, Museums and Historical Memory, Political Activism and Protest Culture, Political Culture, Revolts and Revolutions, World History | Leave a comment

Remembering the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921

The New York Times has published an interactive reconstruction of the predominantly African American neighborhood of Greenwood and mapped the brutal violence of the armed White crowd that destroyed it during the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921. This is a … Continue reading

Posted in Atrocities, Cartographic History, Civil Conflict, Civilians and Refugees in War, Crowd Studies, Cultural History, Digital Humanities, History in the Media, History of Race and Racism, History of Violence, Human Rights, Museums and Historical Memory, United States History and Society, Urban History | Leave a comment

Politicized National Guard Poses Threat

In the aftermath of the Storming of the Capitol on 6 January 2020, political tensions and civil violence continue to grow across the United States, creating a dangerous situation that National Guard forces is now being called to address. At … Continue reading

Posted in Civil Conflict, Comparative Revolutions, Crowd Studies, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, French Revolution and Napoleon, History of Violence, Political Activism and Protest Culture, Political Culture, United States History and Society, War and Society, War, Culture, and Society | 1 Comment

Siege Warfare and the Storming of the Capitol

The Storming of the Capitol of the United States of America on 6 January 2020 represented an insurrectionary act and a military operation, not a riot by a mob. The Pro-Trump supporters who participated in the “Save America” rally and … Continue reading

Posted in Civil Conflict, Comparative Revolutions, Crowd Studies, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, History of Violence, Political Activism and Protest Culture, Political Culture, Revolts and Revolutions, United States History and Society, War and Society, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World | 1 Comment

Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement

It is more important than ever to celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day this year and to remember his vital work for racial equality and social justice. The killing of George Floyd and so many other African Americans over the … Continue reading

Posted in Crowd Studies, Digital Humanities, History of Race and Racism, Human Rights, Museums and Historical Memory, Political Culture, The Past Alive: Teaching History | 1 Comment

Storming of the Capitol

I am appalled by the storming of the Capitol and the violent attack on the U.S. Congress and its members by armed insurrectionists of the pro-Trump “Stop the Steal” movement, who intended to disrupt the certification of the Electoral College … Continue reading

Posted in Civil Conflict, Comparative Revolutions, Crowd Studies, History of Violence, Political Activism and Protest Culture, Political Culture, Revolts and Revolutions, United States History and Society | Leave a comment

The Trial of the Chicago 7 and Historical Film

I saw the new Aaron Sorkin film, The Trial of the Chicago 7, on Netflix over the weekend and would like to recommend the film to any students interested in historical film. Photo: Promotional poster for The Trial of the … Continue reading

Posted in Civil Conflict, Civilians and Refugees in War, Comparative Revolutions, Crowd Studies, Historical Film, History in the Media, History of Violence, Human Rights, Illinois History and Society, Museums and Historical Memory, Northern Illinois University, Peacemaking Processes, Political Activism and Protest Culture, Political Culture, Revolts and Revolutions, War in Film, War, Culture, and Society | Leave a comment