Category Archives: French Wars of Religion

Greg Bereiter Feature

Greg Bereiter (Ph.D. in History, Northern Illinois University) is featured in the American Historical Association’s Member Spotlight. Greg wrote his doctoral dissertation with me on clerical militancy during the French Wars of Religion.  I was honored to work with Greg … Continue reading

Posted in Careers in History, Early Modern Europe, European History, European Wars of Religion, French History, French Wars of Religion, Graduate Work in History, Northern Illinois University, Religious Politics | Leave a comment

Révoltes et révolutions à l’écran

I am happy to announce that a new edited volume has been published on Révoltes et révolutions à l’écran. Europe moderne, XVIe-XVIIIe siècle (Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2015). My chapter, entitled “Les révoltes nobiliaires et les histoires confessionnelles : représentations … Continue reading

Posted in Current Research, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, French History, French Revolution and Napoleon, French Wars of Religion, Historical Film, History in the Media, History of Violence, Political Culture, Revolts and Revolutions, War in Film, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World | Leave a comment

Renaissance Society of America – Berlin

I just returned from the huge Renaissance Society for America [RSA] conference in Berlin, where over 3000 Renaissance studies scholars gathered for an intense conference on early modern history. I presented a research paper on siege warfare and war news, entitled … Continue reading

Posted in Conferences, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, European Wars of Religion, French History, French Wars of Religion, History of the Book, Italian History, Mediterranean World, Museums and Historical Memory, Reformation History, Renaissance Art and History, Warfare in the Early Modern World | Leave a comment

Un Courage Viril

I am giving a presentation on “Un Courage viril. Le genre et la violence en France pendant les Guerres de religion, 1562-1629,” at the séminaire interne of the Institut d’Études Avancées de Paris on Tuesday 3 February 2015. This presentation … Continue reading

Posted in Civil Conflict, Civilians and Refugees in War, Cultural History, Current Research, Early Modern Europe, European History, French History, French Wars of Religion, Gender and Warfare, History of Violence, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Political Culture, Reformation History, Religious History, Religious Politics, Religious Violence, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World, Women and Gender History | Leave a comment

Guerre, Circulations et Transferts Culturels

I recently participated in a fascinating conference in Paris on “Guerre, circulations et transferts culturels de la renaissance à l’Empire” (War, Circulation and Cultural Transfers from the Renaissance to the French Empire), organized by Hervé Drévillon and Arnaud Guinier. Conference … Continue reading

Posted in Conferences, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, European Union, European Wars of Religion, French History, French Revolution and Napoleon, French Wars of Religion, Globalization, History of Science, History of Violence, Maritime History, Mediterranean World, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Religious Violence, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World | Leave a comment

Paris, Ville de Cour ?

Conférence de Caroline zum Kolk will present a lecture on “Paris, Ville de Cour ?” as part of the “Les Mardis de Lauzun” lecture series at the Institut d’Études Avancées de Paris. Mardi 03 Février 2015, 18h00 – 20h00 IEA … Continue reading

Posted in Art History, Cultural History, Early Modern Europe, European History, Food and Cuisine History, French History, French Wars of Religion, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Paris History, Urban History | Leave a comment

French Legion d’honneur and Economic Crisis

The French Legion d’honneur (Legion of Honor), which was created by Napoléon I, periodically creates controversy. The famed Legion d’honneur is granted for military and civil service to the French nation, but the honor has a long and complex history. … Continue reading

Posted in Careers in History, Early Modern Europe, Education Policy, European History, European Union, French History, French Wars of Religion, Humanities Education, Political Culture | Leave a comment