Category Archives: History in the Media

Forensic Historians and War Crimes

War crimes are once again headline news these days, as the Russian withdrawal from the Kyiv region has exposed numerous bodies of Ukrainian civilians allegedly executed during the Russian offensive of February – March 2022. Ukrainian President Zelensky, United States … Continue reading

Posted in Atrocities, Careers in History, Civil Conflict, Civilians and Refugees in War, Graduate Work in History, History in the Media, History of Violence, United States History and Society, War and Society, War, Culture, and Society, Women and Gender History | Leave a comment

The Ukrainian Crisis and the History of War

The current Ukrainian Crisis is being analyzed by security studies and international relations analysts primarily through the lens of recent Russian History and Eastern European Studies (using area studies approaches). War and Society Studies may offer some different perspectives on … Continue reading

Posted in Arms Control, Civil Conflict, Empires and Imperialism, European History, European Studies, European Union, History in the Media, History of Violence, Peacemaking Processes, Political Culture, Political Theory, Security Studies, Strategy and International Politics, War, Culture, and Society | Leave a comment

The History of Black History Month

As Black History Month is celebrated in the United States, it seems like a good time to revisit its history. “In his red-brick rowhouse in the heart of D.C., the man who would become known as the ‘father of Black … Continue reading

Posted in Atlantic World, Cultural History, Globalization, Historiography and Social Theory, History in the Media, History of Race and Racism, History of the Western World, Human Rights, Museums and Historical Memory, The Past Alive: Teaching History, United States History and Society, World History | Leave a comment

Commemorating Montaigne’s Essais

French literary scholars are commemorating the 450th anniversary of the beginning of the writing of Montaigne’s Essais. Michel de Montaigne began writing his innovative essays in southwestern France in 1572, the year of the Saint Bartholomew’s Day Massacre. France Mémoire … Continue reading

Posted in Art History, Atrocities, Civil Conflict, Cultural History, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern France, Early Modern World, European History, European Wars of Religion, French History, French Language and Literature, French Wars of Religion, History in the Media, History of the Western World, History of Violence, Intellectual History, Languedoc and Southern France, Museums and Historical Memory, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Political Culture, Political Theory, Reformation History, Religious Violence, Renaissance Art and History, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World | Leave a comment

Historical Action Figures

This Martin Luther King Day, a new historical action figure is being released. Mattel is launching a Barbie doll portraying Ida B. Wells. The Washington Post reports that “Black American journalist, suffragist and anti-lynching crusader Ida B. Wells will have … Continue reading

Posted in Atrocities, Cultural History, History in the Media, History of Race and Racism, History of the Western World, History of Violence, Human Rights, Women and Gender History, World History | Leave a comment

Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr.

We are remembering Martin Luther King, Jr., and his powerful leadership of the Civil Rights Movement today on MLK Day 2022. WBEZ in Chicago provides Studs Terkel’s famous recordings of the 1963 Train Ride to Washington, focusing on interviews with … Continue reading

Posted in History in the Media, History of Race and Racism, Human Rights, Illinois History and Society, Political Activism and Protest Culture, Political Culture, The Past Alive: Teaching History, United States History and Society | Leave a comment

Politics and News Media in the United States

All news reports adopt positions that are essentially political in nature (whether consciously or unconsciously), by presenting social issues through their selection of interview subjects, quotes, framing, interpretation, and commentary. Political philosophies and positions (not necessarily aligned with political parties) … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural History, Education Policy, European History, European Studies, French History, French Revolution and Napoleon, High School History Teaching, History in the Media, Humanities Education, Information Management, Political Culture, Political Theory, Social History, The Past Alive: Teaching History, United States History and Society, World History | Leave a comment

Sedition and Civil Conflict in the United States

Today, the FBI arrested a eleven members of the Oath Keepers, a far-right militia, over their involvement in the Storming of the United States Capitol on 6 January 2021. The U.S. Department of Justice is charging Stewart Rhodes, founder of … Continue reading

Posted in Civil Conflict, Comparative Revolutions, History in the Media, History of Race and Racism, History of Violence, Political Activism and Protest Culture, Political Culture, Religious Politics, Religious Violence, Revolts and Revolutions, Terrorism, United States History and Society, War, Culture, and Society | Leave a comment

Gruyère: The Latest Round in the Food Culture Wars

Food is Culture! This proclamation is a both a popular idea and a serious anthropological approach to food, cuisine, and agricultural production. Food historians take the cultural dimensions of food production and consumption seriously as revealing important social dynamics. Food … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural History, Culture, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, Environmental History, European Studies, European Union, Food and Cuisine History, Francophonie, French History, Globalization, History in the Media, Italian History, Material Culture, Renaissance Art and History, United States History and Society, World History | Leave a comment

History of Sleep in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Nothing could seem more “natural” than our rhythms of sleep, yet there is a history of sleep. Historians have recognized various changes in sleeping patterns in the modern industrialized and post-industrial world, which have also been studied by scientists. Over … Continue reading

Posted in Archival Research, Cultural History, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern France, Early Modern World, Environmental History, European History, Globalization, History in the Media, History of Medicine, History of Science, History of the Western World, Italian History, Medieval History, Reformation History, Renaissance Art and History, Social History, World History | Leave a comment