Category Archives: Mediterranean World

Renaissance Society of America – Berlin

I just returned from the huge Renaissance Society for America [RSA] conference in Berlin, where over 3000 Renaissance studies scholars gathered for an intense conference on early modern history. I presented a research paper on siege warfare and war news, entitled … Continue reading

Posted in Conferences, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, European Wars of Religion, French History, French Wars of Religion, History of the Book, Italian History, Mediterranean World, Museums and Historical Memory, Reformation History, Renaissance Art and History, Warfare in the Early Modern World | Leave a comment

Pike-and-Blog

A new blog on the history of early modern war and society is active online. Maurizio Arfaioli, a colleague of mine at the Medici Archive Project, has recently launched a website and accompanying blog, entitled Pike-and-Blog. Early modernists will recognize … Continue reading

Posted in Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, Empires and Imperialism, European History, European Wars of Religion, History of Violence, Mediterranean World, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Reformation History, Renaissance Art and History, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World | Tagged | Leave a comment

Masters in Social Sciences

The University of Chicago’s M.A. Program in the Social Sciences (MAPSS) is seeking applicants. Note that the University of Chicago includes History in its Social Sciences division, so this announcement may interest History majors and minors at Northern Illinois University. … Continue reading

Posted in Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, European Union, French History, Graduate Work in History, Human Rights, Mediterranean World, Social History | Leave a comment

Masters Program in Mediterranean Studies

There is a new call for applications to the Masters Program in Mediterranean Studies at NYU.  Here is the announcement: The Center for European and Mediterranean Studies (CEMS) at New York University is pleased to announce a call for applications to its … Continue reading

Posted in Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, European Union, French History, Graduate Work in History, Italian History, Maritime History, Mediterranean World | Leave a comment

Guerre, Circulations et Transferts Culturels

I recently participated in a fascinating conference in Paris on “Guerre, circulations et transferts culturels de la renaissance à l’Empire” (War, Circulation and Cultural Transfers from the Renaissance to the French Empire), organized by Hervé Drévillon and Arnaud Guinier. Conference … Continue reading

Posted in Conferences, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, European Union, European Wars of Religion, French History, French Revolution and Napoleon, French Wars of Religion, Globalization, History of Science, History of Violence, Maritime History, Mediterranean World, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Religious Violence, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World | Leave a comment

Shipbuilding and Mediterranean Ports

Many observers have focused on the decline of industrial factories in Europe when discussing the emergence of a post-industrial economy in the Eurozone. Changes in naval and commercial shipbuilding have often been ignored, except by persons engaged in maritime industries … Continue reading

Posted in European History, European Union, French History, Maritime History, Mediterranean World | Leave a comment

Studying Shakespeare in Venice

The Shylock Project Fondazione Giorgio Cini Venice, 15 June – 11 July 2015 An intensive four-week course of study exploring the text and contexts of Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice. A rich program of lectures and creative workshops by leading scholars, actors, … Continue reading

Posted in Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, Graduate Work in History, Italian History, Lectures and Seminars, Mediterranean World, Renaissance Art and History, Study Abroad | Leave a comment