Category Archives: Social History

A Renaissance of Violence

I am happy to report that my review of Colin Rose’s A Renaissance of Violence: Homicide in Early Modern Italy has just been published on H-Italy. “One of the most brazen murders in Bologna’s history occurred on September 8, 1652, … Continue reading

Posted in Civil Conflict, Cultural History, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, History of Violence, Italian History, Mediterranean World, Renaissance Art and History, Social History | Leave a comment

Politics and News Media in the United States

All news reports adopt positions that are essentially political in nature (whether consciously or unconsciously), by presenting social issues through their selection of interview subjects, quotes, framing, interpretation, and commentary. Political philosophies and positions (not necessarily aligned with political parties) … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural History, Education Policy, European History, European Studies, French History, French Revolution and Napoleon, High School History Teaching, History in the Media, Humanities Education, Information Management, Political Culture, Political Theory, Social History, The Past Alive: Teaching History, United States History and Society, World History | Leave a comment

History of Sleep in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Nothing could seem more “natural” than our rhythms of sleep, yet there is a history of sleep. Historians have recognized various changes in sleeping patterns in the modern industrialized and post-industrial world, which have also been studied by scientists. Over … Continue reading

Posted in Archival Research, Cultural History, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern France, Early Modern World, Environmental History, European History, Globalization, History in the Media, History of Medicine, History of Science, History of the Western World, Italian History, Medieval History, Reformation History, Renaissance Art and History, Social History, World History | Leave a comment

Renaissance Fairs and Pandemics

En garde ! Renaissance fairs are reopening across the United States this summer, bringing the clanging of arms and armor back to an enthusiastic public. These festivals celebrate late medieval and Renaissance culture through costume displays and historical re-enactments—including jousts, … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural History, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, Historical Re-enactment, History in the Media, History of Medicine, Mediterranean World, Renaissance Art and History, Social History | Leave a comment

Diversity in Historical Re-enactments

Colonial Williamsburg, one of the most important sites for historical re-enactment in the United States, is increasingly stressing diversity issues in its historical interpretations of colonial American society. The community of Williamsburg, Virginia, has been promoting building restoration and living … Continue reading

Posted in Atlantic World, Cultural History, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, Empires and Imperialism, European History, Historical Re-enactment, History in the Media, History of Race and Racism, Museums and Historical Memory, Social History, The Past Alive: Teaching History, United States History and Society, Urban History, Women and Gender History | Leave a comment

Irish in Illinois

I would like to celebrate the publication of The Irish in Illinois a new book by my friends and colleagues, Sean Farrell and Mathieu W. Billings. Sean Farrell works on sectarian violence in Irish history and teaches with me as … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural History, European History, Illinois History and Society, Northern Illinois University, Social History, United States History and Society | Leave a comment

Racist Vandalism on Campus

I was saddened and angered to hear of the racist vandalism on Northern Illinois campus early yesterday (Thursday 17 September 2020) morning, when someone spray-painted racist slurs on the Center for Black Studies in an act of targeted vandalism. This … Continue reading

Posted in Academic Freedom, Cultural History, Empires and Imperialism, Globalization, History of Race and Racism, History of Violence, Human Rights, Illinois History and Society, Northern Illinois University, Political Culture, Social History, United States History and Society, World History | Leave a comment

Titian Portrait on View

A Renaissance masterpiece, Portrait of a Lady in White, is currently on view at the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, California.  The portrait by Tiziano Vecelli (known as Titian) is on loan from the Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister in Dresden and … Continue reading

Posted in Art History, Court Studies, Cultural History, Early Modern Europe, Italian History, Material Culture, Museums and Historical Memory, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Renaissance Art and History, Social History | Leave a comment

The Post-Democratic Age and the French Revolution

We live in a “post-democratic age” according to numerous historians, political theorists, and political scientists. Sophie Wahnich recently published an article in Libération, affirming that European society is characterized by a post-democratic political system. Wahnich argues that: “Nous vivons, en … Continue reading

Posted in Early Modern Europe, European History, European Union, French History, French Revolution and Napoleon, Human Rights, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Revolts and Revolutions, Social History | Leave a comment

Masters in Social Sciences

The University of Chicago’s M.A. Program in the Social Sciences (MAPSS) is seeking applicants. Note that the University of Chicago includes History in its Social Sciences division, so this announcement may interest History majors and minors at Northern Illinois University. … Continue reading

Posted in Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, European Union, French History, Graduate Work in History, Human Rights, Mediterranean World, Social History | Leave a comment