Cultures of Voting in Pre-Modern Europe

I am happy to report that my latest publication has been released, just in time for the new year.  Happy 2018!

My chapter on “Municipal elections and contested religious space: electoral practices and confessional politics in Mediterranean France during the French Wars of Religion,” appears in Cultures of Voting in Pre-Modern Europe, ed. Serena Ferente, Lovro Kunčević, and Miles Pattenden (Routledge, 2018).

The book description reads:

Cultures of Voting in Pre-modern Europe examines the norms and practices of collective decision-making across pre-modern European history, east and west, and their influence in shaping both intra- and inter-communal relationships.

Bringing together the work of twenty specialist contributors, this volume offers a unique range of case studies from Ancient Greece to the eighteenth century, and explores voting in a range of different contexts with analysis that encompasses constitutional and ecclesiastical history, social and cultural history, the history of material culture and of political thought. Together the case-studies illustrate the influence of ancient models and ideas of voting on medieval and early modern collectivities and document the cultural and conceptual exchange between different spheres in which voting took place. Above all, they foreground voting as a crucial element of Europe’s common political heritage and raise questions about the contribution of pre-modern cultures of voting to modern political and institutional developments.

Offering a wide chronological and geographical scope, Cultures of Voting in Pre-modern Europe is aimed at scholars and students of the history of voting and is a fascinating contribution to the key debates that surround voting today.

 

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Posted in Early Modern Europe, European History, European Wars of Religion, French Wars of Religion, Mediterranean World, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Political Culture, Religious Politics, Renaissance Art and History, State Development Theory | Leave a comment

Renaissance Map Forgery

The auction house Christie’s has withdrawn an allegedly forged Renaissance map from its auction listings after scholars and map dealers questioned its authenticity.

The map is a print of Martin Waldseemüller’s famous 1507 world map, one of the first to use the name “America” to designate the continents of North and South America.

Nick Wilding, Associate Professor of History at Georgia State University, was one of the experts to raise concerns about the authenticity of the map.  Nick is a former colleague of mine at the Medici Archive Project and an expert on the history of science and the history of the book in the early modern world.

The New York Times interviewed Nick for its story on the forgery and explains that: “For Mr. Wilding, the biggest clue that something was off, he said, was a white line in the Christie’s map. It matched a spot in an authentic print of the map now held at the James Ford Bell Library at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, where extra paper had apparently been added to repair a tear. An original map, one that came directly off the woodblock, would not have replicated that tear, which happened later, Mr. Wilding said. But this map did and so, he said, he believes the map Christie’s has represents a reproduction of the Bell map.”

The New York Times reports on the Waldseemüller forgery.

Posted in Atlantic World, Cartographic History, Digital Humanities, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, Globalization, History in the Media, History of Science, History of the Book, Italian History, Maritime History, Renaissance Art and History | Leave a comment

Crowd-funding French History

The BBC reports that that a crowd-funding project has successfully raised money to purchase a thirteenth-century French castle.

“Thousands of internet users have joined forces to save Mothe-Chandeniers chateau in France. By contributing at least €51 (£45; $61) each, they managed to raise €500,000 needed to buy the ruined 13th Century castle. Each participant is now a co-owner of Mothe-Chandeniers, which the online community plans to restore.”

Medieval and early modern French historians (and especially historians of noble culture, castle design, and military architecture) will be interested in this crowd-funding project to save a medieval French castle. 

The BBC reports on the crowd-funding efforts.

 

 

 

Posted in Early Modern Europe, European History, French History, History of Violence, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Renaissance Art and History, War and Society, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World | Leave a comment

Warrior Pursuits in Paperback

I am happy to report that Warrior Pursuits: Noble Culture and Civil Conflict in Early Modern France (Johns Hopkins University Press) has been released in paperback!

Posted in Early Modern Europe, European History, European Wars of Religion, French History, French Wars of Religion, History of Violence, Languedoc and Southern France, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Religious Violence, Revolts and Revolutions, War and Society, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World | Leave a comment

Warrior Pursuits Soon to be in Paperback

Warrior Pursuits: Noble Culture and Civil Conflict in Early Modern France will soon be available in paperback.

warriorpursuits-cover

Johns Hopkins University Press is planning on releasing the paperback edition of Warrior Pursuits in November 2017. Johns Hopkins already has a website listing for the paperback edition:

https://jhupbooks.press.jhu.edu/content/warrior-pursuits

I cannot wait to see my first book in paperback!

 

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Graduate Student Conference at the Newberry Library

The Center for Renaissance Studies will be holding its annual Graduate Student Conference at the Newberry Library in January 2018.

Graduate students in medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies are encouraged to submit a proposal for this conference.

 

Here is the call for papers:


2018 Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference

Call for Papers

We invite abstracts for 20-minute papers from master’s or PhD students from any discipline on any medieval, Renaissance, or early modern topic in Europe, the Americas, or the Mediterranean world.

The 2018 conference schedule will take place on January 25 to 27, 2018, and will include workshops and presentations with rare books in addition to traditional conference sessions.

Deadline: Sunday, October 15, 2017 at midnight CT

Eligibility: Preference is given to proposals from students at institutions of the Center for Renaissance Studies consortium, but we welcome proposals from students of the Folger Institute consortium.

Submit a proposal using this online form.

A printable CFP is available online here.

Note:
Graduate students at member institutions of the Center for Renaissance Studies consortium may be eligible to apply for travel funding to attend this conference. For more information, visit this webpage.

The Newberry Center for Renaissance Studies

Posted in Conferences, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, European Wars of Religion, Graduate Work in History, Reformation History, Renaissance Art and History | Leave a comment

The Politics of Conversion: Martin Luther to Muhammad Ali

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library hosted a major conference on The Politics of Conversion: Martin Luther to Muhammad Ali last week.

I enjoyed participating in the conference and presenting a paper on “Conversion, Confessional Politics, and Violence in the Final Stages of the French Wars of Religion, 1598-1629,” in a session along with Lee Palmer Wandel, Alejandro Cañeque, Randall Martin, and Walter Melion. The papers fit together nicely, allowing a productive discussion of related rationales, methods, and practices of conversion across early modern Europe and European empires.

Peter Marshall gave a keynote lecture on “Martin Luther and the Invention of the Reformation” to open the conference with a commemoration of the 500th anniversary of Luther’s Ninety-Five Theses.

Regina Schwartz presented a keynote on “Ethical Conversion: ‘I have ta’en too little care of this.'”

The conference coincided with the opening of a new exhibition on Religious Change and Print, 1450-1700 at the Newberry.

Lia Markey, Director of the Center for Renaissance Studies, and the whole team at the Newberry Library did an excellent job of organizing the conference.

Further information about the conference is available online at the Center for Renaissance Studies website at the Newberry Library.  The full program is provided on the Newberry Library website.

Posted in Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, European Wars of Religion, French Wars of Religion, History of Violence, Reformation History, Religious History, Religious Politics, Religious Violence, Renaissance Art and History, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World | Leave a comment